Faculty Book Launch |

Faculty Book Launch

(From left to right) Chairperson: Dean Prof Kishore Mahbubani; Book authors: Dr. Toby Carroll, Associate Prof Wu Xun, Assistant Prof Paul Barter, Associate Prof Darryl Jarvis, Assistant Professor Vu Minh Khuong, Visiting Associate Professor Ashish Lall, Assistant Professor Eduardo Araral, and Visiting Professor M. Ramesh.

(From left to right) Chairperson: Dean Prof Kishore Mahbubani;
Book authors: Dr. Toby Carroll, Associate Prof Wu Xun, Assistant Prof Paul Barter, Associate Prof Darryl Jarvis, Assistant Professor Vu Minh Khuong, Visiting Associate Professor Ashish Lall, Assistant Professor Eduardo Araral, and Visiting Professor M. Ramesh.

On 10 November 2011, the LKY School launched 6 books on a diverse range of themes, such as ASEAN industries, competitiveness, World Bank policy, infrastructure regulation, Vietnamese prosperity, and Asian parking policy. The book authors, all from the LKY School, were Associate Professor Darryl Jarvis, Visiting Professor M. Ramesh, Associate Professor Wu Xun, Assistant Professor Eduardo Araral, Visiting Associate Professor Ashish Lall, Assistant Professor Paul Barter, Assistant Professor Vu Minh Khuong and Dr. Toby Carroll.

Professor M. Ramesh, co-editor of Infrastructure Regulation: What Works, Why and How Do We Know? said the book was part of a series of books covering topics such as deregulation and privatisation. He said the idea behind the book came from Sri Lanka, where infrastructure regulation has not produced desired outcomes. “We were interested in why certain regulations worked while others did not,” he said, adding that the book offers an in-depth analysis of the water, electricity and telecommunications sectors based on case studies from Asian countries and beyond. On the impact of policies on the public sector, Ramish said: “Policy makers need to keep in mind that unless the right conditions are present, regulations will not work.”

Dr Darryl Jarvis, the author of ASEAN Industries and the Challenge from China, said the country’s economic ascent has presented new challenges and opportunities for the ASEAN region. “China’s rise is neither a negative nor an overwhelmingly positive development,” said Jarvis. It is imperative that ASEAN industries engage with China and work on implementing strategies to benefit from market opportunities, he said, adding that ASEAN need not worry about China’s rise. 

Dr Ashish Lall, author of Facets of Competitiveness: Narratives from ASEAN, said his book “isn’t a typical economics book” but a collection of essays providing useful insights on competitiveness challenges and policies for various countries at different stages of development. A major theme of the book is the importance of geographical location in the success of industries. Lall said: “It’s crucial to recognise that different locations make different industries optimally use their resources for their competitive advantage.” Hence, competitive economic activities are not universally dispersed but concentrated in certain places, he said. The book, Lall said, illustrates the rapid growth of economic activity in the ASEAN region, as well as looks at important policy lessons the region can offer for both developed and developing countries.

Dr Paul Barter, an expert on parking issues and urban transport, examined different types of parking policies in his book, Parking Policies in Asia. The book was written in response to the dearth of literature on urban car parking policies in Asia, Barter said, noting that studies in the field have become more important with the “rapid urbanisation and motorisation of Asian cities”. The book highlights parking policies of 14 major Asian cities and investigates how market forces can increase parking efficiency.

In his book, Vietnam: the Voyage to Prosperity, published in Vietnamese, Dr Vu Minh Khuong reflects on the right course of development that Vietnam should pursue. Although Vietnam has been doing relatively well in the last few years, growth has been hampered by “poor governance, ineffective economic strategies and the absence of an inspiring vision”, said Vu. Growth is equally affected as much by geographical location as the productivity of people, he noted. In hjs book, Vu draws comparisons with successful countries such as Singapore, and looks at how Vietnam can undertake similar policies to spur its development.

In his book, Delusions of Development: The World Bank and the Post-Washington Consensus in Southeast Asia, Dr Toby Carroll addresses the World Bank’s policies in Southeast Asia and discusses their negative impact based on interviews he conducted on the ground. “The Bank’s development reports cannot be always positive as it claims”, said Carroll, adding that its policies actually created more problems in certain countries. The World Bank could also do more good if it “depoliticised the development process”, he argued.

Responding to a question posed by a member of the public on the level of awareness of other countries about the ASEAN region, the panellists noted while certain Western countries still seemed to know very little, others such as Canada appeared to recognise the growing importance of the region. This is evidenced by the growing number of publications by Canadian institutions, as well as the number of forums and seminars hosted about the region. The panellists highlighted the growing South–South interest in Asia and the role of China and India in raising understanding about the region.

 

By Uran Bolush, a first-year Master of Public Policy student at the LKY School.

 
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Date:
Thursday, 10 November 2011
Time:
5.00 p.m. - 6.30 p.m.
Venue:

Seminar Room 2-1
Level 2, Manasseh Meyer
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
469C Bukit Timah Road
Singapore 259772

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