Public Housing in Hong Kong and Singapore |

Public Housing in Hong Kong and Singapore

Synopsis:

The development of massive public housing programs in Hong Kong and Singapore has been called “one of the most striking paradoxes of urban policy in the world.”  The puzzle lies in the commitment of these two, strongly capitalist Asian tigers to a redistributional program usually associated with mature social democracies. The growth of their housing programs occurred in the context of rapid economic development and openness to market forces, but under the leadership of strong developmental states. We argue that, in contrast to many of their counterparts, state officials in these city states recognized that programs providing extensive public goods could be supportive of private investment rather than in conflict with it. Nearly twenty-five years later we show that these have continued to expand and are instrumental in maintaining the legitimacy of the economic and social system. We also indicate the differences between them as Hong Kong has limited its program to a greater extent than Singapore. We identify their greatest deficiency in their failure to accommodate migrant workers. Finally we show that they can present a model for other cities.

Speaker(s):

Prof Norman Fainstein, Visiting Professor, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy; Visiting Fellow, Singapore Centre for Liveable Cities;
Prof Susan S. Fainstein, Visiting Professor, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy; Visiting Fellow, Singapore Centre for Liveable Cities

Date:
Thursday, 13 March 2014
Time:
12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Venue:

Seminar Room 3-5,
Manasseh Meyer,
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy,
469C Bukit Timah Road,
Singapore 259772

RSVP:
Seats are limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Kindly register your interest in attending online.

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